I vote to obey the Supreme Court TRO on the foreign currency deposits of the Chief Justice

U R G E N T !

13 February 2012

Senator Vicente Sotto III

Senate Majority Leader

By fax and by hand

Dear Senator Sotto:

This is to respectfully request you to relay the following message to our colleagues in caucus on Monday, February 13. Thank you.

My Vote:

I vote to obey the Supreme Court TRO on the foreign currency deposits of the Chief Justice, on the following grounds. These six grounds are based on the ideology that the impeachment court is not almighty, not absolute, not illimitable, and not more supreme than the Supreme Court.

Continue reading

THE NATURE OF AN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL

By

Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago

(Keynote speech delivered at the joint annual convention of the Philippine Society of Hypertension, and Philippine Lipid and Atherosclerosis Society, held at the Crowne Plaza Galleria in Quezon City on 8 February 2012.)

Length of Time

The impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton was held in 1999. It began on January 7 and ended on February 12, with an acquittal. Thus, the Clinton trial lasted for just about a month. We are not going to be as lucky with the present impeachment trial, as I shall explain later.

When the US Senate acted as an impeachment court against federal judges, the shortest trial took a little more than a month; and the longest trial lasted about 14 months. The average length of the U.S. impeachment trials against federal judges is about four months.

In my considered estimate, our ongoing impeachment trial will last for about five months. It began in January, and will probably end by about May.

Continue reading

MIRIAM’S MEDICAL BULLETIN

Dear Senate media:

            I miss our daily banter and am desperately trying to get well.  I also miss the impeachment trial punctuated by certain personalities who have all the charm of show window mannequins.  But my health is not cooperating.  However, I shall be happy to hear from you for phone interviews, if the questions are not about the merits of the case.

Continue reading